Last edited by Fenribei
Friday, February 7, 2020 | History

7 edition of Wittgenstein at his word found in the catalog.

Wittgenstein at his word

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  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Thoemmes Continuum in London, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 1889-1951

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementDuncan Richter.
    SeriesThoemmes Continuum studies in British philosophy
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB3376.W564 R473 2004
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3306754M
    ISBN 10082647473X
    LC Control Number2004051603

    The remainder of his life was marred by a succession of increasingly severe illnesses. After attending a school specialising in mathematics and the physical sciences he enrolled in the Technische Hochscule in Charlottenburg, Berlin into study mechanical engineering, leaving with a diploma after only three semesters. He admits this claim "will be anathema to many Wittgenstein scholars", adding the comment -- witty if incongruous -- that he suspects that Wittgenstein is right here; "to be right", of course, is to be in agreement with Luntley p. The notion of the world as such is just the notion of the things and properties of the world being a certain way and their being that way constraining our use of words to speak of these things. In the language game of doubting, there is a possibility of satisfying oneself.

    However in one place p. But such circumstances are not so defined as to allow us to set down a rule. His Philosophical Investigations opens with a long discussion of how children learn language, in order to investigate what the essence of language is. Or one can, while still in the interpretative mode, go a more convoluted route and argue -- i. This picturing relation, Wittgenstein believed, was our key to understanding the relationship a proposition holds to the world.

    He was cleared, ultimately, but he had already resigned, and years later he confessed to friends that he had lied at the hearing to protect himself. He moved from a position which seeks to capture meaning in a net of logic, to one which allows the everyday use of language to give rise to meaning. But he soon changed his mind, coming to regard him as the epitome of genius, in both its positive and negative aspects. In the circumstances, there are rules according to which statements make sense, and some kinds of statements do not. That, and his pure and purifying personality. Well, it seems to be that a direct response such as the one Moore is attempting is impossible.


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Wittgenstein at his word book

That of Philosophical Investigations is concerned with a detailed study of language as commonly used rather than with logical abstraction.

For instance, one could be permitted to write the number "" when asked, "what is the next number is the following series:, ,? Doing this, however, does not mean, as Fogelin thinks, "taking his methodological statements at face value.

The philosophy of the Tractatus sees propositions as logical pictures, and seeks to construct a logical foundation for those aspects of experience expressible in language.

When we make out the grammar of first-person reports of sensations we realize that the very idea of "private language" is incoherent -- so one cannot even ask of its existence or non-existence. Translation issues make the concepts hard to pinpoint, especially given Wittgenstein's usage of terms and difficulty in translating ideas into words.

On the contrary, if only everyone were true to his nature, he thought, everyone could be like this.

Notes on Wittgenstein’s “On Certainty”, Part 1

His expectations for his students were incredibly high. What use is a rule to us here? His take on language and by extension, on knowledge seems to me militantly refractory to formalization of any kind. He seems to mean that we are under no obligation to make an assertion just because it is true, yet it would be more natural to express the link between truth and obligation by saying that we are in normal circumstances under an obligation not to make an assertion if it is false.

Luntley questions the widely shared notion that one of the things Wittgenstein takes Augustine to task for in the opening remarks of Philosophical Investigations is invoking ostensive definitions in his account of language learning. And what does it mean to take Wittgenstein at his word?

The line of thought is cluttered up rather than clarified by a panoply of terms and distinctions "the Augustinian picture" vs. Along the way, Luntley makes some obscure moves.

How Wittgenstein Found God (and Wrote a Masterpiece) in the Trenches of World War One

The boldness of his project is refreshing. Contrary to other interpreters holding dissimilar interpretative ideologies, however, there is no embarrassment here. Certainty is as it were a tone of voice in which one declares how things are, but one does not infer from the tone of voice that one is justified.

He may have chosen the book rather than the hand because it is perhaps slightly more obvious that there are special circumstances in which we could be wrong.

When the man says he knows he has hands, he can say it, and I accept it, in the context of a situation in which he could have found this out. The final passages argue that logic and mathematics express only tautologies and are transcendental, i. It is wrong because, in this case, there are no grounds for doubting that I am a human being.

On the outbreak of the First World War, he volunteered for service in the Austro-Hungarian army, serving with distinction and gaining several medals for bravery. Impelled by his family background, he developed an interest in machinery. The logical form can be had by the bouncing of a ball for example, twenty bounces might communicate a white rook's being on the king's rook 1 square.

The confusion that the Tractatus seeks to dispel is not a confused theory, such that a correct theory would be a proper way to clear the confusion, rather the need of any such theory is confused. He suggests that someone who argues that grammar can be justified by an appeal to how things are need not mean how things are "in the raw" -- i.

I found their summary of the Tractatus which, BTW, I've never managed to read particularly illuminating. Philosophers here are led astray because they attempt to do things with language that it is not equipped to do. After some difficulty over who was to write a Prefacethe Tractatus was published in German inthen translated into English by Frank Ramsey, a brilliant Cambridge undergraduate.

I am put in mind here of Clifford Geertz's comment that some anthropologists "have, wonder of wonders, been speaking Wittgenstein all along" [Local Knowledge, Basic Books, ], p. Everything speaks in its favour, nothing against it.From toWittgenstein taught at the University of Cambridge.

During his lifetime he published just one slim book (the page Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, ), one article (" Some Remarks on Logical Form ", ), one book review and a children's sylvaindez.comal advisor: Bertrand Russell.

understanding of the aim of the Tractatus depends upon taking Wittgenstein at his word here. If one adopts it as a point of departure for reading the text and allows oneself “strictly to think it through”5, resolute readers take a proper understanding of the avowed aim of the work to have far-reaching exegetical consequences.

– Wittgenstein’s picture theory is not about pictures in the sense of mental images. His view is that *language* — words arranged into sentences — is a picture of the facts, not that it involves pictures in the visual sense.

– Also, Kierkegaard did not introduce the word “Angst,” which was a well-established Danish word. *Prices in US$ apply to orders placed in the Americas only. Prices in GBP apply to orders placed in Great Britain only. Prices in € represent the retail prices valid in Germany (unless otherwise indicated).

Books online: Taking Wittgenstein at His Word: A Textual Study (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy),sylvaindez.com Taking Wittgenstein at His Word, Robert J Fogelin - Shop Online for Books Brand: The University Press Group Ltd. The Logical Must is an examination of Ludwig Wittgenstein's philosophy of logic, early and late, undertaken from an austere naturalistic perspective Penelope Maddy has called Second Philosophy.

The Second Philosopher is a humble but tireless inquirer who begins her investigation of the world with ordinary perceptual beliefs, moves from there to empirical generalizations, then to deliberate.